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Lake Stevens Hard Money Lenders

 

Lake Stevens Hard Money Loans

Intrust Funding is a Lake Stevens residential hard money lender providing loans for residential real estate to investors in Snohomish County. Acquire your next property, renovate your next investment, or cash-out refi your last loan today. With funding in 48 hours, no inspections, no appraisals, and a simple 1% per month interest rate, Intrust Funding is real estate investing simplified.

Lake Stevens, nestled around the beautiful lake of the same name, is a thriving city in Snohomish County with a population of over 33,000. The city’s serene environment, combined with its high-performing schools and robust economy, make it an appealing location for residential real estate investments. Its proximity to major employment hubs like Everett and Seattle also enhances its desirability for both residents and investors. Whether you’re eyeing the waterfront properties or the charming homes further inland, Lake Stevens offers numerous opportunities for real estate investment.

 

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A Real Estate Investor’s Guide to Lake Stevens

Lake Stevens, WA
Snohomish County
Geography
Employment
Transportation

Lake Stevens, WA

The city of Lake Stevens may be small with only 8.9 square miles of city limits and one high school in the district, but it has come a long way from its humble beginnings. The town has transformed many times over the years, functioning as a homestead, a mill town, and a resort community of lake side cabins. With the cost of living rising in denser cities throughout the region, Lake Stevens is becoming a popular option for commuters. Located in Snohomish County along State Route 9, the city is only a short distance from downtown Snohomish and Everett. The population of Lake Stevens jumped from 6,361 in the year 2,000, to an estimated 33,378 in 2018, according to the United States Census Bureau. With the likelihood of those numbers rising, Lake Stevens is a good area for those looking to purchase a long term investment property using a hard money loan.


Snohomish County

Home to Everett, its largest city and the county seat, Snohomish County is the third most populous county in Washington state, and the 76th in the United States. As the western portion faces the Puget Sound and other bodies of water, and consequently contains most of its population, the eastern portion is part of the Cascade Mountains and the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest, with very few settlements.


Geography

The city lies on a plateau between the Snohomish River delta, which separates it from Everett and Ebey Island to the west, and the foothills of the Cascade Mountains. It surrounds the north and east sides of Lake Stevens, the largest and deepest lake in Snohomish County, with an area of 1,040 acres and an average depth of 64 feet . The lake has 7.1 miles of shoreline and is fed by Lundeen Creek, Mitchell (Kokanee) Creek, and Stitch Creek. It drains into Catherine Creek, which then flows to the Pilchuck River. The lake’s relatively small watershed, at 4,371 acres (1,769 ha), minimizes the effect of upstream pollution but reduces flow to remove pollutants. Lake Stevens installed aeration system in the 1990s to control the release of phosphorus from lake sediments, which caused unwanted algae growth. Most of the shoreline is heavily developed, with little remaining native vegetation, and Lake Stevens is used for recreational fishing, swimming, boating, and skiing.


Employment

As of 2018, Lake Stevens has an estimated workforce population of 23,393 people, of which 15,084 are employed. The largest sectors of employment are manufacturing (18%), followed by educational and health services (17%), retail (13%), and professional services (11%). The majority of workers in the city commute to other areas for employment, including 20 percent to Everett, 13 percent to Seattle, and 4 percent to Bellevue. Approximately 6.3 percent of Lake Stevens residents work within the city limits. Over 81 percent of workers commute in single-occupant vehicles, while 2 percent take public transportation and less than 10 percent use carpools.


Transportation

Lake Stevens is traversed by three state highways that connect the area to other parts of Snohomish County: State Route 9, running north–south through the west of the city and continuing to Snohomish and Arlington; State Route 92, which continues northeast to Granite Falls; and State Route 204, which connects Frontier Village to U.S. Route 2. The intersection of State Route 9 and State Route 204 and several roads around Frontier Village are planned to be replaced by a series of roundabouts after a proposed interchange was scrapped. The Hewitt Avenue Trestle, which carries US 2 to Everett, is a four-lane freeway that is frequently congested and is planned to be rebuilt to fix capacity issues.


Lake Stevens, WA

The city of Lake Stevens may be small with only 8.9 square miles of city limits and one high school in the district, but it has come a long way from its humble beginnings. The town has transformed many times over the years, functioning as a homestead, a mill town, and a resort community of lake side cabins. With the cost of living rising in denser cities throughout the region, Lake Stevens is becoming a popular option for commuters. Located in Snohomish County along State Route 9, the city is only a short distance from downtown Snohomish and Everett. The population of Lake Stevens jumped from 6,361 in the year 2,000, to an estimated 33,378 in 2018, according to the United States Census Bureau. With the likelihood of those numbers rising, Lake Stevens is a good area for those looking to purchase a long term investment property using a hard money loan.

Snohomish County

Home to Everett, its largest city and the county seat, Snohomish County is the third most populous county in Washington state, and the 76th in the United States. As the western portion faces the Puget Sound and other bodies of water, and consequently contains most of its population, the eastern portion is part of the Cascade Mountains and the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest, with very few settlements.

Geography

The city lies on a plateau between the Snohomish River delta, which separates it from Everett and Ebey Island to the west, and the foothills of the Cascade Mountains. It surrounds the north and east sides of Lake Stevens, the largest and deepest lake in Snohomish County, with an area of 1,040 acres and an average depth of 64 feet . The lake has 7.1 miles of shoreline and is fed by Lundeen Creek, Mitchell (Kokanee) Creek, and Stitch Creek. It drains into Catherine Creek, which then flows to the Pilchuck River. The lake’s relatively small watershed, at 4,371 acres (1,769 ha), minimizes the effect of upstream pollution but reduces flow to remove pollutants. Lake Stevens installed aeration system in the 1990s to control the release of phosphorus from lake sediments, which caused unwanted algae growth. Most of the shoreline is heavily developed, with little remaining native vegetation, and Lake Stevens is used for recreational fishing, swimming, boating, and skiing.

Employment

As of 2018, Lake Stevens has an estimated workforce population of 23,393 people, of which 15,084 are employed. The largest sectors of employment are manufacturing (18%), followed by educational and health services (17%), retail (13%), and professional services (11%). The majority of workers in the city commute to other areas for employment, including 20 percent to Everett, 13 percent to Seattle, and 4 percent to Bellevue. Approximately 6.3 percent of Lake Stevens residents work within the city limits. Over 81 percent of workers commute in single-occupant vehicles, while 2 percent take public transportation and less than 10 percent use carpools.

Transportation

Lake Stevens is traversed by three state highways that connect the area to other parts of Snohomish County: State Route 9, running north–south through the west of the city and continuing to Snohomish and Arlington; State Route 92, which continues northeast to Granite Falls; and State Route 204, which connects Frontier Village to U.S. Route 2. The intersection of State Route 9 and State Route 204 and several roads around Frontier Village are planned to be replaced by a series of roundabouts after a proposed interchange was scrapped. The Hewitt Avenue Trestle, which carries US 2 to Everett, is a four-lane freeway that is frequently congested and is planned to be rebuilt to fix capacity issues.

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